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Thanks for visiting my vintage Hamilton watch blog. I like to restore US-made Hamilton wrist watches back to their original glory and share my experiences with other enthusiasts. Use the "Search" space below if you know what model you're looking for. Feel free to leave polite comments or questions in the spaces provided. Also check out my "watches for sale" on my Etsy site - the link is on the right, just below.

Friday, July 12, 2013

1955 Ward - Restoration

Part of the challenge of maintaining a blog is having new posts of watches I haven't already shown before.  After 180 posts, it's really hard not to have repeats.  However, I've got a few new things in the hopper to show you during July - so stay tuned.

For starters, here's a 1955 Ward.  The Ward was produced for three years and I think there are two dial varieties out there... one with gold dots and one without.  As you can see in the 1955 catalog, the dial is described as having "black numerals and yellow pearled dots"
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And then in 1956 the catalog describes the dial as having "black numerals and pearled dots".
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The Ward has a 10K yellow gold filled case with a stainless steel back.  Inside is an 8/0 sized American-made 17-jewel 747 movement, or possibly the 730, as Hamilton replaced the 747 with the upgraded 730 around the time the Ward was in production.  The hands on a Ward are yellow alpha style.

I recently picked up a Ward in need of some TLC.  I got a pretty good deal on it since it was in pretty rough shape.

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Now I'm going to go out on a limb and call this a 1956 or 57 model since the dial has black pearled dots.  The dial appears to be original and there are no markings on the back of it to indicate otherwise.

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The 747 inside had a broken balance staff - easily diagnosed since the balance (on left) wobbles.  The hairspring on the balance is also a mess - so this balance will need to be replaced in it's entirety.

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Everything get's disassembled, cleaned and set out to dry.  I've also got a new old stock glass crystal to install in the bezel.

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With a new balance and a fresh mainspring, this 747 is back in action and ready for another 60 years of use.  It's running 3 seconds fast per day with great amplitude.

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And here's the finished product, all polished up with a clean dial and new lizard-grain leather strap.  Not a bad restoration, if I do say so myself.

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6 comments:

  1. Just purchased it from you on Ebay. This is a birth year watch for me. I have been looking for one that I would want to wear, and not just something to keep in the drawer since I can't trust it. +3 per day is pretty amazing, but I imagine that you put a bit of effort into getting it right.

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  2. Thanks Jerry, I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

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  3. Beautiful watch. I am having to work hard keeping my wife from wearing it since she insists that it is too small for my 7.75" wrist. That did not stop me from wearing it all day today.

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  4. Ha ha! Sounds like you need another! Maybe the Rodney I have for sale right now. It's from the same year and its much larger. Then your wife will be happy too!

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  5. Hi do you you know the power reserve of a recently serviced 730 Hamilton movement? Thanks in advance

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  6. You would need to wind it fully and note how long it runs before stopping.. Do that a couple of times and that's the power reserve. It should be a little over 40 hours - assuming it has a fresh mainspring.

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