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Thanks for visiting my vintage Hamilton watch blog. I like to restore US-made Hamilton wrist watches back to their original glory and share my experiences with other enthusiasts. Use the "Search" space below if you know what model you're looking for. Feel free to leave polite comments or questions in the spaces provided. Also check out my "watches for sale" on my Etsy site - the link is on the right, just below.

Sunday, February 3, 2013

1918 910 Pocket Watch

Hamilton made a variety of pocket watches before they introduced their first wrist watches.  Pocket watches ranged in size from 6/0 sized ladies watches to 18 size railroad watches.  Somewhere in between is their size 12 pocket watches.

I recently picked up a Hamilton 17 jewel 910 pocket watch in a local shop.  The movement dates to 1918.

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The 910 comes in a family of other 900-series movements in various jewel counts.  It's a 12-size movement but it's a special design where the main plate is a larger diameter than the rear of the movement.  Some folks view it as a cross between a 12-size and 14-size movement.  What it really means though is that it goes into a special case which later 12-size watches won't fit (and vice versa).  So to put a 910 (or similar) movement into a case, you need to have a case specifically made for that family of movements.

My pocket watch came with everything except the crystal so after an overhaul to make sure it was cleaned and oiled, I installed a new glass crystal.  This watch is pendant-set... so you pull the crown out to set the time and push it back in to wind it.

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This pocket watch comes in a three-piece hinged case.  So the center folds into the back, and the front bezel folds onto the dial.  Then it all snaps shut.

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1 comment:

  1. I just received a 910 and this has helped to identify it. By the serial number, mine was made in 1920. When it is wound, it runs like a rocket. The minute hand moves like a second hand. Can you tell me what the problem is likely to be and the cost of repair?

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